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Winter Semester 2015/16 - Prof. Dr. Christiane Brosius and Prof. Dr. Ulrike Gerhard

MA-Seminar
Planetary Urbanism: Perspectives from the Global South and North

This seminar is held jointly by the disciplines of Geography and Cultural Anthropology. Our aim is to engage urban theory with concrete examples from cities in the so-called “Global South” and the “Global North”. The idea behind this is that most of the current research on urbanization processes is strongly related to perspectives from either the North (West) or the South, and that it is still evolving from concepts rooted in Euro-American epistemologies. “Planetary Urbanism” challenges established canons, for instance, binary oppositions we easily take for granted, such as “urban” – “rural”, “center”-“periphery”, “public” - “private” or “developed” and “backward”.

While Prof. Brosius is working on Indian cities, Prof. Gerhard has done most of her research on North American cities. What can we learn from a cosmopolitan and multi-sited perspective? The concept of planetary urbanism (Brenner 2013, Brenner & Schmid 2015) offers some theoretical background to approach cities throughout the globe. Thus, we will structure this seminar with intensive reading on comparative or planetary urbanism, accompanied by discussions and presentation by the students. We start with sessions on theoretical concepts, followed by key themes and case studies. By the end of the seminar, students will be encouraged to present individual or team-based projects.

Other activities, besides intense discussions of the mandatory readings for each class will be the production of a class paper, and short commentaries on readings or specific cases of urbanization.

Themes of the class are:  Inequality and segregation; Middle classes and gated communities; the spectacle city (mega-events), Urban protest movements; Migration and public art. Regional examples in the readings cover South Africa, India, Canada, Germany, the Gulf States, or the USA.

 

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Winter Semester 2015/16 - Cathrine Bublatzky, M.A.

MA-Seminar

(Un)motivated attention: visual cultures and the practices of looking

 

In this course we focus on the social functions of visual objects and media in different cultural contexts. Photographs or YouTube clips rapidly circulate in various online media and reach a countless number of people all over the world. Thus, different kinds of (un)filtered knowledge, information and events are transferred, translated, and acknowledged. Especially during times of crises, natural catastrophes or disasters, visual material published in social media play a crucial role to 'keep updated', 'feel with' or 'make up your mind'. Borrowed from the discipline of psychology the notion of 'motivated attention' addresses how such visualized information is perceived and employed for social engagement across geographic and cultural borders. Hereby "practices of looking" are inherent and interlinked with other strategies such as consuming of or producing visual material in different cultural settings. This does not only allow us to critically elaborate on historical careers of mass media such as photography, facebook or YouTube but will draw our attention to visual practices such as street art, 'selfies' or mobile-filming as transcultural processes of critical engagement and solidarity with incidents such as the 'Arab spring' or 'Charlie Hebdo'. The aim of this course will be to discuss selected case studies in context of visual culture and media studies with particular focus on ethnographic methodologies.

 

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Winter Semester 2015/16 - Laila Abu-Er-Rub, M.A.

MA-Seminar

Single in the City: Gender, Media and Urban Space

This seminar is about new gendered subjectivities in urban areas with a focus on Asia, particularly India and China. It is based on the research conducted by the HERA SINGLE project in Delhi and Shanghai (www.hera-single.de).

In the last decades the number of female and male singles has increased considerably in India and China due to changing family patterns and various (trans)cultural encounters such as border-crossing media, migration flows, cosmopolitan aspirations and neoliberal notions of ‘Global cities’. In this course we will aim at answering the following questions: Why do women and men increasingly choose to be single in Chinese and Indian urban centres? How does being single affect the movement and perception of women in public spaces in Shanghai and Delhi? What imaginaries come into being due to new possibilities for gender subjectivities? In how far does singlehood affect career choices? How are single (wo)men portrayed in media discourses?

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Summer Semester 2015 - Prof. Dr. Christiane Brosius and Cathrine Bublatzky, M.A.

MA-Seminar
Representing Migration in Film and Art

The phenomenon of migration is one of the most dramatic socio-cultural, economic and political experiences of movements in the word. Caused by very diverse reasons such as war, political repression, work and educational aspirations, natural disasters or famine, migration is a heterogeneous phenomenon. It shapes not only the mobility of humans but also of concepts such as 'self' and 'other' across socio-political, geographical and temporal borders.

This seminar focuses on the theme of migration from the perspective of artistic and media practitioners who conceptualize the experience of migration along different groups, localities, events or borders in contemporary art and film. Here, the notion of transculturality and critical transregionality allows us to focus on video art, photography, painting, multi-media as well as on cinematic commercial and alternative video production. Themes range from mobile videos taken by cheap labour migrants from Asia in the Middle East to questions of artistic space-making of illegal and informal migration to high-end professional 'flexible' and transnational art markets and events.

Summer Semester 2015 - Cathrine Bublatzky, M.A. and Dr. Franziska Koch

MA-Seminar 

Curating Culture? Curating Art? The Venice Biennale in anthropological and art-historical perspectives

The seminar teaches an interdisciplinary approach to analyzing contemporary curatorial and artistic practices in our globalized contemporary art world. Taking the Venice Biennale for Contemporary Art 2015 as a relevant case study, we discuss the roles and concepts of specific curators in relation with the artists/works that will participate in Venice from art-historical and anthropological perspectives. A main aim is to develop interdisciplinary methodological approaches that allow us to critically (re)consider  long-standing as well as recent curatorial strategies that frame the works of artists from different geographical regions and cultural backgrounds in the traditionally "nationalist" exhibition taxonomy of the biennale. The seminar is research-based and includes an excursion to the Venice Biennale (mandatory) allowing the students to conduct their own research projects on either the overall theme of the exhibition, on a single national pavilion, or a specific curator and his framing of particular artists. These projects will be developed throughout the seminar and concluded by means of a written term paper.

The seminar will introduce students to relevant ethnographic and art-historical methods and provide room for existent skills and knowledge to be deepened by means of individual and team work based seminar phases. Participants will learn to reflect critically on the Venice Biennale and the kind of art notion that it projects with a special focus on the art historical context and the cultural dimension of this prominent exhibition format.

The seminar provides students with a special opportunity to sharpen their writing skills on art and exhibitions. Depending on the nature of the collected data in Venice the final term paper may take the shape of a visual essay that students will conceptualise and accomplish based on a wiki that allows to integrate visual with textual material.

This course is research-based and includes a 3 day trip to the Venice Biennial; the excursion is settled for the 3rd week in May (between 19th and 23rd of May).

Winter Semester 2014/15 - Cathrine Bublatzky, M.A.

MA-Seminar 
Methods in Visual and Media Ethnography

In this seminar we will discuss methods for researching visual and media cultures. Basing on theories and methods of Visual and Media Anthropology the main questions for this seminar are 'How to conduct research on visual material and media? And how to analyse and approach visual data in academic writing?' In the first part we will discuss relevant concepts of visual and media cultures such as the social life and agency of visual objects, the circulation and distribution of popular media and material cultures as well as the discussion on socio-cultural practices of perception, 'seeing' and consuming in relation to concrete casestudies. In the light of writing culture debate (James Clifford) and visual material studies we will explore academic practices of collecting, archiving, analysing as well as writing on visual material. As a relatively new discipline of what is called 'Digital Humanities' and to what the Heidelberg Research Architecture (HRA) at the Cluster of Excellence contributes to with a digital research environment for students and scholars (e.g. photo-wiki; HyperImage (image annotation platform), this second part of the seminar focuses also on different ways of ethnographic writing about visual cultures. This seminar prepares students with a particular interest in visual and media cultures for research-based seminars and projects (e.g. for their MA thesis) and allows them to engage with visual cultures that are part of research fields such as migration and urban studies, youth cultures or visual art studies.

Winter Semester 2014/15 - Dr. Cora Bender

MA-Seminar 
The Magic of Modernity: Transcultural Perspectives on Religion and Media

This course addresses the role of media in the formation of the religious, starting from the assumption that new media have facilitated an unforeseen return of religious practice on global scale. It looks at how people use media: What role do media play in people's individual religious experience, in the communicative every-day religious practice, and in the formation of religious communities - especially those with a political background? In order to be able to reconstruct the relations between religion, media, and politics in a given setting, we will analyse the various regional and global processes of circulation. We will pay especially close attention to new anthropological studies focusing on the materiality of religious forms, their circulation, alienation and re-appropriation. The ultimate goal of the course is to attain a deeper and more complex understanding of the relationship between religious, political and media practice in the age of globalization.

Summer Semester 2014 - Prof. Dr. Christiane Brosius and Cathrine Bublatzky, M.A.

MA-Seminar 
Art as Ethnography: Exploring events, markets and urbanity

The boundaries between anthropological and artistic research and practices are sometimes remarkably blurred. In this seminar, based on case-studies, we want to look at such themes that are of interest both to anthropologists and artists: urbanisation and public art, art festivals and exhibition practices such as Biennales, environment and climate change, and a variety of strategies to construct and analyse 'Otherness'. Our focus here will be on South Asia, particularly on Indian contemporary art practice.

In this context, the notion of transculturality and critical transregionality allows to elaborate on video art, photography, painting or multi-media production. The seminar is research-intense, and will be based on group work, plenary discussions, project-based research, and a tutorium (extra cps). It is structured into a first part focussing on concepts (readings and discussion work), followed by concrete case-studies and the development of an exposé for a project. Students will learn how to engage with and build databases, create visual essays, use ethnographic methods. For their research, students will be provided with various visual material (e.g. art works, artist interviews, documentary footage, etc.) in an image database and furthermore with the digital image annotation tool, HyperImage (HRA). With supervision by tutors (participation is mandatory) students get introduced to the technical elements in HyperImage to work on their projects and to combine writing and visual data in their argument.

Summer Semester 2014 - Cathrine Bublatzky, M.A. and Dr. Roos Gerritsen

BA-Seminar 
Visualizing the everyday: City & Media I

More than half of the world's population lives in cities and urbanization has reached unprecedented levels as the numbers of city dwellers are rapidly increasing. The rapid expansion of cities often causes worries in technocratic terms about cities as problematic spaces that require a solution. But cities are complicated webs of architecture, space, social relations, everyday experiences, cultural expressions to name just a few. Moreover, the present is increasingly defined as formed by communication and media technologies. But how are these entangled and how do they shape each other? What role does art or visual culture play in the social production of space? How does urban space act as a context for media-related practices? And how is urban space mediatized, i.e. represented by specific media or art contexts?

In this course we address these questions by looking at the relation between the urban experience and visual and material culture. We deal with topics such as popular culture, museums, politics, class, identity and memory and their constitutive relationship with the city. Students will gain theoretical insights in the key concepts of social structure in India, urban anthropology, the anthropology of art, museums and visual anthropology.

While this course has mainly a theoretical focus on the issues described above, this course is also leading up to a fieldwork period in Chennai for some students, and therefore special attention is paid to south Asian and particular south Indian anthropology.

Winter Semester 2013/14 - Prof. Dr. Christiane Brosius

MA-Seminar 
On the Move: Diaspora Theories and Case Studies

The aim of this course is to take an interdisciplinary approach, in order to chart the development and challenges of transnational Asian and Eurasian 'cultures' in the world today. A wealth of new literature has appeared on issues of globalisation and locality, migration and diasporas, with key challenges being difference and integration; cultural, religious or national identity; nomadism and transnational connections. This broad body of work attempts to reconceptualise the world and personhood beyond the boundaries of the nation-state, in terms that redefine the experience of colonialism and the relationship of Europe with its 'others'. It places an emphasis on cultural flows and international migration as an integral part of human history, where difference and identity are mediated and renegotiated through historical processes. Key foci will be contemporary migration contexts in Europe, the USA and Asia. Important concepts are youth and old age, gender, ethnic, religious and cultural identity, as well as civil society and citizenship. This course draws on established and new bodies of work on migration studies, issues of space and identity, transnationalism, postcolonialism, and theories of diaspora and globalisation. Drawing on historical memory and personal narratives of slavery and indentured labour, we chart the changing processes of international migration and the subsequent emerging forms of identity in diasporic communities in the modern world. Students are encouraged to examine concepts such as 'diaspora' and 'globalisation' from a critical perspective. In addition to academic texts, students will also be taught using film and fiction.

Winter Semester 2013/14 - Prof. Dr. Christiane Brosius et al.

MA- lecture series
Introduction to Transcultural Studies

The concept of transculturality can be conceptualized both as a heuristic device and a  focus of study. It is embedded in a heterogeneous landscape of theoretical and methodological approaches drawing on many disciplines and covering diverse thematic, historical and geographic areas. Jointly conducted by researchers in the three study foci of the MA Transcultural Studies, this lecture class will explore the contributions and limitations of inherited and current approaches to cultural interactions. Theories and methods will be tested, e.g., in explorations of global art and exhibition practices, appropriations of philosophical and religious ideas, and the relationship between patterns of consumption and exchanges of commodities. The goal of the course is to introduce students to diverse disciplinary perspectives enabling them to frame their own studies of transcultural phenomena.

Winter Semester 2013/14 - Cathrine Bublatzky M.A.

MA-Seminar 
Photographic Archive and Hyper Image

Visual objects like photographs or images are part of our everyday life, be it by producing, seeing or collecting them. They shape our memories, the way we perceive and acknowledge the world and how we communicate with others. The increasing circulation of visual objects via media and new technologies defines thereby a wide area for anthropological studies on visual cultures. Of major interest is thereby how cultural meaning of visual objects is produced and how the meaning changes according to different localities and social groups? 

In this course we follow two major aims: First we want to focus on visualities in everyday live and elaborate on ways how Anthropologists investigate visual objects under a transcultural perspective. With a closer look on different case studies like family photography or photo studios, the circulation of images on Facebook and blogs or visual documentations of popular events or contemporary art practices, theoretical and methodological approaches in Anthropology will be discussed. This is the theoretical introduction to the second part of the course with focus on practice in Visual Anthropology and when students develop and conduct their small field projects.

Summer Semester 2013 - Prof. Dr. Christiane Brosius

MA-Seminar 
Cityscapes - Urban worlds and imaginaries in Asia and Europe

In this seminar, students will explore the "global city" as a conceptual and empirical tool for engaging in transcultural studies and theorising its possibilities. India and China will serve as key focal regions for the engagements with case studies but we will also include key texts and examples from European cities (e.g. Berlin, London, Paris). Asian varieties of urbanism have a history and contemporary form closely connected to Western global-city models, but are also informed by a dense matrix of local lives, national politics and regional particularities. Moving beyond the macro-perspectives of political economy and economic geography, the seminar will familiarise students with the rich contributions that an anthropological approach can make to framing the urban in a globalising Asian context. Through exposure to a varied range of cultural studies methods, including  ethnography (e.g. on social spatialisation, migration),  visual studies (film, art, architecture) and social anthropology, the seminar will foster a critical appreciation of everyday life as an agent of urban change,  juxtaposed against the global city as dazzling branded entity, grand national show-case and varieties of cosmopolitanism.

Summer Semester 2013 - Prof. Dr. Christiane Brosius and Simone Heidbrink, M.A.

MA-Seminar 
Between Protest and Celebration: Media - Ritual - Performance

Our life-worlds, beliefs and aspirations, anxieties and actions, have increasingly become visible in and through media. However, media and everyday life are not connected in a 1:1 relationship, they do not mirror each other. What we see in the media does not necessarily have to exist in the 'real world(s)' and vice versa! Moreover, access to media is often restricted, concerning both certain subjects and certain people. One image, one video clip, one statement going 'viral', can create unforeseeable actions, just think of the Mohammed video released on You Tube in the summer of 2012, the 'Arab' spring or 'Anonymous' activities. One Event, such as the Royal Wedding of Kate Middleton to Prince William in 2011, shapes (the illusion of) a global audience who celebrate this act in and through the media. Love is no longer 'made in heaven' but in the media, it seems. But there are also more local versions of mediatised protest that require our knowledge of particular contexts.

There is a lot of potential for both protest and celebration that challenges us to think about the connection of media, ritual and performance in a critical, interdisciplinary way, considering their global and local contexts. Where is the connection between media and revolutionary movements? Is media really a means of creating and circulating rituals of protest? Is protest or celebration in the media 'real'? Or is the media only a means of building up online heroes/martyrs for a mostly passive audience?
Media, rituals and performance are closely intertwined and often condition each other. They may mark everyday practices as much as more transcendental aspects of 'being in the world'. They also allow for a closer look at the people, institutions, concepts and images involved. This course will focus on media, rituals and performance by means of theoretical texts and case studies that constitute protest, celebration in everyday and special situations around the world. We will make use of theories and methods from (Media) Anthropology and Religious Studies, and discuss them in the light of the examples at hand.

Summer Semester 2013 - Dr. Christiane Kahrmann

MA/BA-Seminar 
Bonding and Belonging of "Third Culture Kids"/"Cross-Cultural Kids"

"Third culture kids" (TCKs) are children who spend at least part of their childhood in countries and cultures others than their parents" (Pollock 2009). They are also  referred to as: "internationaly mobile youths", "global nomads" or "cross-cultural kids". Their transient globetrotting lifestyle suggests that they are living at the forefront of globalization. More research needs to be donne to further understand how globalization has impacted TCKs' sense of cultural identity (Tanau 2008, Cockburn 2002, McLachlan 2005).

In a small research project we will accompany a group of TCKs through a collaborative journey of  reporting and reflection about their concepts of belonging and identity as a result of their highly mobile and/or cross-cultural lives. On two field trips, we will visit an international school in the outskirts of Heidelberg and take part in their annual international festival and daily school life. We will also look at their transnational networking via skype and social media such as facebook and at the (digital) narratives they have created about themselves.

Summer Semester 2013 - Cathrine Bublatzky M.A.

BA-Seminar (held in German)
Ethnographische Fotografie in Asien und Europa - Ein transkultureller Ansatz Teil 2 Praxis

Der 1. Teil des Seminars bietet eine Einführung in Grundlagen und Diskussionen der visuellen Ethnologie. Wir lesen "Klassiker" der Ethnologie, die sich mit Fotografie innerhalb der Ethnologie und der damit verbundenen historischen und auch technischen Entwicklungen auseinder gesetzt haben. Zugleich wenden wir uns gegenwärtigen Ansätzen zu, welche sich mit alternativen Methoden und der Verwendung der Fotografie innerhalb der visuellen Ethnologie beschäftigen. Dabei ist die Anwendung der Fotografie zur technischen Datenerhebung (z.B. Howard Morphy und Marcus Banks oder Sarah  Pink) ebenso wichtig wie das Erforschen von Fotografien von "Informanten" oder als historische Quelle (z.B. Elizabeth Edwards). Der Abschluss des 1. Teils stellt die Konzeptionierung eines eigenen Foto-Projekts unter Einbezug einer relevanten theoretischen Diskussion und der Planung einer eigenen Fallstudie dar.

Im 2. Teil des Seminars wenden wir uns der fotografischen Praxis zu. Dies bezieht die Handhabung von digitalen Fotokameras "im Feld" ebenso mit ein wie das Sammeln, Kommentieren und Analysieren der Fotografien in einer Datenbank sowie die Zusammenstellung von Bild und Text im Rahmen einer kleinen Ausstellung.
Die Seminarteilnehmer sollen in dieser Veranstaltung die Möglichkeit erhalten, Forschungsmethoden unter Einsatz von Fotokameras (z.B. Feldforschung, teilnehmende Beobachtung, Interviewstrategien, Erstellung von Fotografien, Analyse von Fotografien) durchzuführen und im Rahmen der Ausarbeitung und Durchführung eigener oder gemeinschaftlicher Projektarbeiten Erfahrungen innerhalb der visuellen Ethnologie zu sammeln (Sommer 2013). Die Betreuung von Materialien findet zum Teil online statt (Moodle, elearning). Im Rahmen dieser Veranstaltung wird auch die Archivierung, Beschreibung und Analyse von visuellem Material mit Hilfe  einer visuellen Datenbak erarbeitet.

Winter Semester 2012/13 - Cathrine Bublatzky M.A.

BA-Seminar (held in German)
Ethnographische Fotografie in Asien und Europa - Ein transkultureller Ansatz Teil 1 Theorie

Das Seminar richtet sich an Bachelor-Studierende, die sich mit Theorien und Methoden der Fotografie und mit der Visuellen sowie Medienethnologie und Transkulturellen Studien auseinandersetzen wollen. Der Fokus dieser Veranstaltung ist auf 2 Seminare aufgeteilt: im Wintersemester 2012/13 (Teil1) steht die theoretische Diskussion  über das Verhältnis von Fotografie und Ethnologie im Vordergrund. Im Sommersemester 2013 (Teil 2) steht die Durchführung und Umsetzung eines eigenen fotografischen Projektes im Fokus, welches in Teil 1 erarbeitet wurde.

Der 1. Teil des Seminars bietet eine Einführung in Grundlagen und Diskussionen der visuellen Ethnologie. Wir lesen "Klassiker" der Ethnologie, die sich mit Fotografie innerhalb der Ethnologie und der damit verbundenen historischen und auch technischen Entwicklungen auseinander gesetzt haben. Zugleich wenden wir uns gegenwärtigen Ansätzen zu, welche sich mit alternativen Methoden und der Verwendung der Fotografie innerhalb der visuellen Ethnologie beschäftigen. Dabei ist die Anwendung der Fotografie zur technischen Datenerhebung (z.B. Howard Morphy und Marcus Banks oder Sarah Pink) ebenso wichtig wie das Erforschen von Fotografien von "Informanten" oder als historische Quelle (z.B. Elizabeth Edwards). Der Abschluss des 1. Teils stellt die Konzeptionierung eines eigenen Foto-Projekts unter Einbezug einer relevanten theoretischen Diskussion und der Planung einer eigenen Fallstudie dar.

Im 2.Teil des Seminars wenden wir uns der fotografischen Praxis zu. Dies bezieht die Handhabung von digitalen Fotokameras "im Feld" ebenso mit ein wie das Sammeln, Kommentieren und Analysieren der Fotografien in einer Datenbank sowie die Zusammenstellung von Bild und Text im Rahmen einer kleinen Ausstellung.

Die Seminarteilnehmer sollen in dieser Veranstaltung die Möglichkeit erhalten, Forschungsmethoden unter Einsatz von Fotokameras (z.B. Feldforschung, teilnehmende Beobachtung, Interviewstrategien, Erstellung von Fotografien, Analyse von Fotografien) durchzuführen und im Rahmen der Ausarbeitung und Durchführung eigener oder gemeinschaftlicher Projektarbeiten Erfahrungen innerhalb der visuellen Ethnologie zu sammeln (Sommer 2013). Die Betreuung mit Materialien findet zum Teil online statt (Moodle, elearning).

Winter Semester 2012/13 - Dr. Cora Bender

MA-Seminar
Media, Globalization, and the Body in Transcultural Perspective

Globalisation more than any other recent influence, is responsible for creating a number of far-reaching paradigm shifts in cultural categories of the body. Transformations in what we perceive as our "natural bodies" or our most personal, intimate body experience occur as boundaries of bodily behaviours, concepts, and even boundaries of the body itself are being shifted and reshaped. In this course we examine new theoretical frameworks as well as ethnographic examples from lived worlds, scientific labs, medical clinics, and virtual worlds to gain a new understanding of "body" and "embodiment" in the era of transnationalism, neoliberalism, and global cultural flows. We will explore topics such as biopower, aesthetics, genomics, masculinities, modification, racialization, and virtuality.

Winter Semester 2012/13 - Dr. Cora Bender

MA-Seminar
Potlach, Powwow, "Snake Dance": Ritual dynamics and changing knowledge cultures in Native North America

One of the most current images of today's global pop culture is that of the traditional American Indian as an ecological saint steeped in "natural" spirituality. This, however, is a projection that corresponds more to the needs and wishes of "us moderns" than to those of the people it emulates. In this course, we will explore rituals in native North America from a different perspective: We will look at native North American cultures as knowledge cultures with a present as well as a history. Dealing with 500 years of Euro-American presence, these knowledge cultures underwent considerable change, sometimes by force, sometimes self-determined. Ritual and performative action is one of the key arenas in which the issues of domination, adaptation, self-determination, and resilience are being played out. Examining rituals as knowledge that can be transferred, transformed, suppressed, forgotten, and re-activated, we will use critical approaches from history, anthropology, and media studies to obtain multiple perspectives on the interactions of native and non-native peoples in matters of ritual.

Summer Semester 2012 - Prof. Dr. Christiane Brosius, Cathrine Bublatzky M.A.

BA-Seminar (held in German)
Konzepte und Methoden der Kunstethnologie am Beispiel der "Documenta 13"

Das Seminar richtet sich an Bachelor-Studierende, die sich mit Theorien und Methoden der Kunst- und Museumsethnologie, der Visuellen und Medienethnologie sowie Globalisierung und Transkulturellen Studien auseinandersetzen wollen. Der Fokus dieser Veranstaltung liegt auf der Documenta, einer internationalen Kunstausstellung, die alle 5 Jahre und 2012 zum 13. Mal in Kassel stattfinden wird (09. Juni bis 16. September 2012).

Dieses forschungsbasierte Seminar bietet eine Einführung in Grundlagen und Diskussionen der Medien- und vor allem Kunstethnologie. Wir lesen 'Klassiker' der Ethnologie, die sich mit Kunst und Kunsthandwerk auseinander gesetzt haben, vor allem aber rezente Ansätze, die uns dem Phänomen der Globalisierung von Kunst näher bringen. Dabei sind Forschungsmethoden wie 'multi sited ethnography' (George E. Marcus 1995) ebenso wichtig wie ein Einblick in Migrationsforschung oder auch Technologien des Films und der Fotografie oder des Machens von Ausstellungen.

Die Documenta dient hierbei als Beispiel, ein wichtiges Kunstereignis nicht nur in seiner Aktualität sondern auch als Ereignis im historischen sowie wirtschaftlichen Kontex zu verstehen. Wie etwa lässt sich erklären, dass in den letzten Jahren verstärkt Künstler aus so genannten 'Entwicklungsländern' in Lateinamerika, Afrika oder Südasien ausgestellt werden? Können wir überhaupt noch sagen, was 'typisch' afrikanisch oder 'indisch' aussieht? Wie gehen wir als Ethnologen mit künstlerischen Genres um, mit Dokumentarfilm, Installationen, Performances? Was müssen wir über einen Künstler wissen, damit wir seine oder ihre Kunst verstehen?

Die Seminarteilnehmer sollen in dieser Veranstaltung die Möglichkeit erhalten, Forschungsmethoden (z.B. Feldforschung, teilnehmende Beobachtung, Interviewstrategien, Analyse von Kunstwerken und kuratorischen Praktiken) im Rahmen der Ausarbeitung und Durchführung eigener oder gemeinschaftlicher Projektarbeiten zu sammeln. Hierfür ist eine mehrtägige Exkursion (ca. erste Hälfte Juni) zur Documenta nach Kassel geplant. Darüber hinaus findet 14-tägig eine Übung statt, in welcher Entwicklung, Ausarbeitung und Analyse der Projektarbeiten betreut und vertieft werden. Die Betreuung und Arbeit mit den Materialien findet zum Teil online statt (moodle, elearning).

Summer Semester 2012 - Prof. Dr. Christiane Brosius

MA/Magister-Seminar
Let's talk about Love: Studying romance and other Emotions in globalizing South Asia

Are emotions expressed and groomed alike everywhere across the globe? If not, what is different, why, and how can we research a topic such as this from a transcultural, media-based and anthropological perspective? This seminar features media and images centre-stage as they are very important for the communication and negotiation of feelings: be they 'manifested' in love letters and songs, films or online dating portals. How can we understand 'globalised sentiments' in the age of transnational migration, where long-distance relations of kinds require a careful and often risky 'emotionak economy' of agents involved. Why does Bollywood 'touch' a cord across ethnic boundaries, why do we believe that online dating might lead to 'the right one'? Can we better understand why Valentine's Day is also an event that arouses moral panic and hatred among certain groups of people, at certain times, in different places? We also look at experts of relationships and romance, such as radioconsultant 'Love Guru', therapists, or spiritual leaders and ask what role they play in rapidly developing and changing urban environments in South Asia. What happens to other sentiments and social relations when the love for being in love seemingly overshadows all and everything; does 'arranged marriage' come to an end because of individual preferences? What about 'spiritual love' going global, as in the case of new religious movements such as Art of Living, or Amma? We will also consider historical depts and explore how some of today's moral panics about 'culture' and 'tradition' must be traced back to the colonial era, Victorian morality and religious reform movements.

Summer Semester 2012- Tina Schilbach, M.A.

MA Seminar                                                                                                        

China intimate: private lives in a globalising society

This seminar will introduce students to the cultural politics of private life, personal relationships and the domestic in contemporary Chinese society. A particular focus will be on a transcultural perspective. In this, students will be invited to assess how China's globalisation process has affected the nature of the private, and how these changes relate to wider postmodern social theories around family, kinship, romance and the relationship between individual and society.

Despite sweeping economic change, the past three decades of reform in China have seen only cautious transitions in the public and political spheres of civil society. However, the reform process has opened up new spaces for personal lives, and the emancipation of individual agency in the private pursuit of consumer lifestyles, home ownership, web activism or romantic relations. China's new private world has been celebrated as a place where people can practice civil society. Yet, scholars have also been more critical, arguing that the spaces of personal life not only contest the underpinnings of power but also reproduce them. As "consumer citizens" and calculating individuals eager to use inter-personal networks "to get ahead", wider social concern seems limited. At the same time, for many Chinese people, family offers a safer space that is particularly important at times of severe social and economic insecurity. Though challenged by generational conflicts and the migration experience, family life continues to play a significant role in managing uncertainty. Finally the personal relationships people cultivate have become more diverse, and - for both rural and urban Chinese - increasingly include a new set of emotional expectations that go beyond an economics of class, power or social mobility.

From a discussion of socialist practices of private life, the seminar will proceed to familiarise students with the growing anthropological  literature on China's micro-environment, including case studies of the home, childhood, urban middle-class youth, rural migrant women, middle age and later life as well the diaspora.

Summer Semester 2012- Laila Abu-Er-Rub, M.A.

MA Seminar
A transcultural approach to Beauty

Beauty may lie to some extent in the eye of the beholder, nevertheless concepts of beauty are always culturally bound and are thus related to other realms like concepts of body, health, philosophy, art and religion just to name a few. The main focus of the seminar will be to trace how local concepts of beauty have been changed through intercultural encounters throughout history. We will begin with reading and discussing theories of aesthetics and beauty (e.g. from Umberto Eco and Roger Scruton) and continue with case studies from different cultural contexts. These will include, for instance,  how a cult of health and beauty developed in Germany and America at the turn of the 20th century, how the German trend traveled to China; why Japanese Geishas blackened their teeth to be beautiful, how global beauty peagants changed urban beauty ideals in India and Nigeria, and why Eastern European und Brazilian beauties travel to Asia to work as models.

We will further briefly examine the depiction of beauty in Western and Eastern art and how beauty ideals in contemporary media are transformed in different localities due to intensified globalising processes. At the end of the seminar we will aim at answering questions like:  How has modern medicine with its capability of transforming bodies through various technologies (e.g. cosmetic surgery) shaped concepts of beauty on a global scale? How is this linked to the global rise of consumer culture? Which role do the cosmetic industry and globally disseminated advertising and fashion images play in that process? Participants will write a visual essay on a self-chosen topic.

Summer Semester 2012 - Prof. Dr. Christiane Brosius, Anne Scheuing, M.A. und Christoph Bertolo, M.A.

BA-Seminar
Ethnographischer Film - Konzepte, Methoden und Praxis, Teil 2

Course requirements 

Are emotions expressed and groomed alike everywhere across the globe? If not, what is different, why, and how can we research a topic such as this from a transcultural, media-based and anthropological perspective? This seminar features media and images centre-stage as they are very important for the communication and negotiation of feelings: be they 'manifested' in love letters and songs, films or online dating portals. How can we understand 'globalised sentiments' in the age of transnational migration, where long-distance relations of kinds require a careful and often risky 'emotionak economy' of agents involved. Why does Bollywood 'touch' a cord across ethnic boundaries, why do we believe that online dating might lead to 'the right one'? Can we better understand why Valentine's Day is also an event that arouses moral panic and hatred among certain groups of people, at certain times, in different places? We also look at experts of relationships and romance, such as radioconsultant 'Love Guru', therapists, or spiritual leaders and ask what role they play in rapidly developing and changing urban environments in South Asia. What happens to other sentiments and social relations when the love for being in love seemingly overshadows all and everything; does 'arranged marriage' come to an end because of individual preferences? What about 'spiritual love' going global, as in the case of new religious movements such as Art of Living, or Amma? We will also consider historical depts and explore how some of today's moral panics about 'culture' and 'tradition' must be traced back to the colonial era, Victorian morality and religious reform movements.

Winter Semester 2011/12 - Prof. Dr. Christiane Brosius, Prof. Dr. Barbara Mittler

BA/MA/Magister Artium-Seminar
A/Effective Prints: Popular Visual Culture in India and Greater China  

Popular prints - propaganda posters as well as greeting cards, comics caricatures and advertisements - change the world. They do so by enabling images, words and thus, ideas and stories, to circulate into diverse directions, at great speed and in considerable variety. These images, words, ideas and stories in turn e/affectively become part of the lives and thoughts, the emotional households, mindmaps and memories of people, across time and space. In this seminar, we will study the ways in which the world of popular prints has a/effectively shaped the imaginaries as well as the lives and realities in India and (Greater) China in their respective long twentieth centuries.

The seminar is explicitly interdisciplinary and encourages advanced B.A. and Magister/Master students from the fields of Transcultural Studies, Chinese Studies, South Asia Studies, History, Art History, Anthropology etc. to explore the tools and concepts of studying cultural processes and entanglements through the lens of printed media. Of major interest will be strategies of social distinction, of gender, ethnic, national or cultural identities, of youth/old age and consumer culture, of politics and propaganda, of religious change and migration.

One key interest in the seminar will be to enable participants to see and discuss cross-cultural connections - either between Europe and Asia, or within Asia, to study the flow of ideas, through printed media, into new contexts; to explore the appropriation of foreign elements into local settings, and thus to become well-equipped in discourses on cultural practice, media issues related to localisation and globalisation, and concepts and methods of image and media analysis.

Topics to be addressed: The Happy Family; Romantic Love and Bridal Glamour; Gender, Bodies and Sexualities; Work and the Everyday; Consumption Rituals and Spaces; Heroes and Martyrs

Winter Semester 2011/12 - Prof. Dr. Christiane Brosius; Tina Schilbach, MA

MA Seminar
Varieties of urbanisation: a cultural anthropology of Asia's global cityscapes  

In this seminar, students will explore the "global city" as a conceptual and empirical tool for engaging in transcultural studies and theorising its possibilities. Cities in India and China (especially New Delhi and Shanghai) will serve as  case studies for Asian  varieties of urbanism. Their history and contemporary form are closely connected to Western global-city models, but are also informed by a dense matrix of local lives, national politics and regional developments. Moving beyond the macro-perspectives of political economy and economic geography, the seminar will familiarise students with the rich contributions that an anthropological approach can make to framing the urban in a globalising Asian context. Through exposure to a varied range of cultural studies methods, including ethnography, visual studies (film, art, architecture) and social anthropology, the seminar will foster a critical appreciation of everyday life as an agent of urban change, juxtaposed against the global city as dazzling branded entity, grand national show-case and uncompromising cosmopolitan hierarchy.The seminar programme will start off with identifying key conceptual maps and theoretical works of global city research, and re-connect them to the history of New Delhi, Shanghai, and others. Moreover, we will look at select themes of urban governance and social engineering which produce the visual spaces and social realities of contemporary Delhi and Shanghai, comparing them with the forms and expressions they take in the quotidian experiences and individual narratives of urbanites living throught these transformations. The unsettling programmatic of rapid visual, spatial and social change that seems to be so characteristic of Indian and Chinese cityscapes, will be subjected to critical evaluation and commentary.Topics may range from cities and social groups (e.g., middle class, youth, work migrants, women, students) to the city as a religious, festival and leisure place; architecture and urban planning (e.g., gated communities, informal settlements, heritage sites, art galleries); spatial practices (e.g., clubbing, pilgrimage, tourism, settlement demolishment and regeneration), to mention only a few.

Winter Semester 2011/12 - Prof. Dr. Christiane Brosius et al

MA Transcultural Studies - lecture series
Introduction to Transcultural Studies   

The concept of transculturality can be used both as a heuristic device (e.g. multi-perspectivity and multi-locality) and focus of study (e.g. cultural entanglements). It is embedded in a large and very heterogeneous landscape of theoretical and methodological approaches that come from various disciplines and cover different thematic, historical and geographic areas. Jointly conducted by the five Cluster chairs, this lecture class will discuss the contributions and limitations of inherited and current notions of transculturality. Focusing on the three study areas of the MA TS, and the respective fields of research of the lecturers, theories and methods will be tested, e.g. in explorations of global art and exhibition practices, appropriations of philosophical and religious ideas, and the relationship between patterns of consumption and the exchange of commodities. The goal of the course is to introduce students to diverse disciplinary perspectives enabling them to frame their own studies of transcultural phenomena and perspectives.

Winter Semester 2011/12 - Cathrine Bublatzky

BA Seminar
Museumsethnologie - Ausstellen von Kulturen  

In diesem Seminar beschäftigen wir uns mit den vielfältigen Beziehungen zwischen der Anthropologie und der Welt der Museen, dabei untersuchen wir nicht nur die Rolle der Anthropologie  in der Praxis der Ausstellung von Kulturen sondern auch Wechselwirkungen mit lokalen künstlerischen Praktiken und Konzepten. Beginnend mit den Ausstellungspraktiken ethnographischer Museen im 19.und 20. Jahrhundert und einflussreichen Arbeiten von Anthropologen wie Franz Boas gewinnen die Fragen Bedeutung, wie ausgewählte Objekte zu ethnographischen - oder in Kunstmuseen ausgestellten Objekten werden,warum und durch wen. Deshalb umfasst die Diskussion die historische Entwicklung des ethnographischen Museums von der Kolonialzeit bis heute sowie kontroverse Praktiken des "Sammelns und Ausstellens von Kulturen", welche maßgeblich  zur Definition von "Kulturen der Anderen" beigetragen haben. Wir werden uns daher nicht nur mit der Entstehung des "Völkerkundemuseums", der "Weltausstellungen" und "Völkerschauen" des 19. und 20. Jahrhunderts befassen, sondern auch mit Kunstmuseen als wichtigen Orten des Sammelns und Ausstellens kultureller Objekte. Auf Grund der Kategorisierung ethnographischer Objekte in "primitive Kunst" bis hin zu "schönen Künsten" stellt heute die kunst- und museumsethnologische Forschung moderner und zeitgenössischer Kunstausstellungen in Zeiten kultureller Globalisierung eine weitere Herausforderung dar.

Winter Semester 2011/12 - Cathrine Bublatzky

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BA Seminar
Museumsethnologie - Ausstellen von Kulturen  

In diesem Seminar beschäftigen wir uns mit den vielfältigen Beziehungen zwischen der Anthropologie und der Welt der Museen, dabei untersuchen wir nicht nur die Rolle der Anthropologie  in der Praxis der Ausstellung von Kulturen sondern auch Wechselwirkungen mit lokalen künstlerischen Praktiken und Konzepten. Beginnend mit den Ausstellungspraktiken ethnographischer Museen im 19.und 20. Jahrhundert und einflussreichen Arbeiten von Anthropologen wie Franz Boas gewinnen die Fragen Bedeutung, wie ausgewählte Objekte zu ethnographischen - oder in Kunstmuseen ausgestellten Objekten werden,warum und durch wen. Deshalb umfasst die Diskussion die historische Entwicklung des ethnographischen Museums von der Kolonialzeit bis heute sowie kontroverse Praktiken des "Sammelns und Ausstellens von Kulturen", welche maßgeblich  zur Definition von "Kulturen der Anderen" beigetragen haben. Wir werden uns daher nicht nur mit der Entstehung des "Völkerkundemuseums", der "Weltausstellungen" und "Völkerschauen" des 19. und 20. Jahrhunderts befassen, sondern auch mit Kunstmuseen als wichtigen Orten des Sammelns und Ausstellens kultureller Objekte. Auf Grund der Kategorisierung ethnographischer Objekte in "primitive Kunst" bis hin zu "schönen Künsten" stellt heute die kunst- und museumsethnologische Forschung moderner und zeitgenössischer Kunstausstellungen in Zeiten kultureller Globalisierung eine weitere Herausforderung dar.

Summer Semester 2011 - Prof. Dr. Christiane Brosius, Cathrine Bublatzky M.A.

MA-Seminar
The Global Contemporary: exhibitions and art from an Anthropological perspective

This seminar focuses on the global contemporary art world with specific attention to exhibition and collection projects about contemporary Asian art, as the Indian Art Summit in Delhi, the Venice Biennale 2011, the Centre for Art and Media Technologies (ZKM) in Karlsruhe or the art collection of the Deutsche Bank and its ‘Asian contemporary’ in Frankfurt/Main 2011.

This researched-based seminar is offered to students with a special interest in Visual and Media Anthropology, Anthropology of Art, Museum Anthropology and Transcultural studies of art and exhibition practices as well as students of European or Global Art History. Art events as the Biennale in Venice or the Deutsche Bank exhibition on Asian contemporary art will function as an applied framework for the anthropological discussion of transcultural practices of selecting, displaying and exhibiting arts from various parts of the world in order to elaborate not only on the agency of artists, curators and museums, art collectors and dealers but also to critically approach the asymmetrical power relations that mark globalised art worlds.

Students will get the opportunity to gain research experiences (e. g. fieldwork, participatory observation, interview strategies, analysis of art works and curatorial practices) by designing and conducting individual or collaborative projects. They may focus on particular artists or works or the curatorial concepts within the institutions of the Biennale or the museum (ZKM), to mention a few options. The outcomes of the projects will be presented online. This course will be conceptualized as an blended learning seminar and contribute to the Double Degree Programme "Media and Material Culture" with the Department of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology’ at the University of Leiden.

Summer Semester 2011 - Prof. Dr. Christiane Brosius

BA-Seminar
Ethnologie der Diaspora

In Europa leben gegenwärtig zahlreiche Menschen aus südasiatischen Ländern. Die Gründe und Zeitpunkte für ihr Kommen sind vielfältig: politische und wirtschaftliche Faktoren wie Studium und Beruf, Flucht vor politischer Verfolgung, Armut oder Krieg mögen eine Rolle spielen. Vor allem die sogenannte zweite oder dritte Generation jugendlicher Südasiaten sieht ihre Zukunft in Europa, die Heimat ihrer Eltern oder Grosseltern erscheint ihnen exotisch, fremd oder gar rückständig. Zugleich sehen sie sich mit verschiedenen Formen der Diskriminierung in ihrem Heimatland konfrontiert. In diesem Seminar setzen wir uns mit der Frage nach den Umständen und Hintergründen von Migration auseinander, nach Integrations-, Gruppenbildungs- und anderen Identifikationskonzepten und Prozessen. Dies geschieht vor allem mit Bezug auf Beispiele aus Grossbritannien, den USA und Deutschland. Auf diese Weise sollen verschiedene Zugangsmöglichkeiten zu theoretischen Konzepten der Diasporaforschung und Methoden der Erforschung von Diasporagemeinschaften diskutiert werden. Der Fokus wird auf Indien, Nepal und Sri Lanka liegen. Für Ethnologen zentrale Konzepte wie Staatsbürgerschaft, Gender, Jugend, Religion, Kaste, Klasse, werden anhand ausgewählter Texte und Fallstudien behandelt. Neben ethnographischen Beispielen sollen Studierende so mit Theorien und Methode der Diasporaforschung in der Ethnologie vertraut gemacht werden. Das Seminar soll in seinem zweiten Teil stark von der Eigeninitiative der Studierenden, in Kleingruppen an Kurzprojekten zu arbeiten leben. Hier können wir von der Präsenz südasiatischer Kultur im Umfeld von Heidelberg und Frankfurt profitieren. ein zusätzlicher Projekttag gilt dem Dokumentarfilm: Der Filmemacher Kesang Tsering aus Nepal wird seinen Film "In Search of the Riyal" (2010) über nepalesische Niedrigstlohnarbeiter in den Arabischen Emiraten vorstellen und mit uns diskutieren.

Summer Semester 2011 - Cathrine Bublatzky M.A.

Exercise
The Global Contemporary: exhibitions and art from an Anthropological perspective

Please note: This exercise is a supplement to the MA course "The Global Contemporary: exhibitions and art from an Anthropological perspective" held by Prof. Dr. Christiane Brosius and Cathrine Bublatzky.

The course will be a combination of a reading- and discussion group accompanying the seminar "The Global Contemporary – exhibitions and art from an Anthropological perspective". Beside the additional discussion of relevant anthropological articles this group will deal with upcoming questions and challenges the students face in their projects about exhibiting contemporary art. Therefore, anthropological approaches to art, the usage of image-data-bases as well as fieldwork shall be trained.

The related seminar "The Global Contemporary: exhibitions and art from an Anthropological perspective" will be made up of excursions to various exhibition sites. For this we still have no confirmation of time and can only apply for funding once we have concrete numbers of students. thus, we would appreciate your enrolement as soon as possible. excursions are planned to Frankfurt (opening of the Asia Collection at Deutscha Bank) and ideally to Paris (an exhibition on Paris, Delhi and Mumbai at the Centre Pompidou with a stay of one night) or Venice (Venice Biennial, visit of India pavillion, China pavillion).

Winter Semester 2010/11 - PD Dr. Beatrix Hauser

Seminar
Die Ethnologie ästhetischer Ausdrucksformen: Von der Ethnokunst zur Transkulturalität

Aus ethnologischer Sicht stellen sich Fragen nach Ausdrucksformen, Ästhetik und Kunst zugleich als "Goldgrube" und als "Minenfeld" dar. Einerseits ziehen sich Studien zu kulturspezifischen Schönheitsidealen, Regeln der Gestaltung oder der Wertschätzung von Objekten durch die Fachgeschichte, andererseits ist die systematische Bestimmung des Ästhetikbegriffs und seine Verwendung im Kulturvergleich höchst umstritten. Der Paradigmenwandel, Kulturen nicht mehr als inselhafte Gebilde aufzufassen, sondern als hybride, im sozialen Leben "verhandelte" Bezugspunkte verschiedenster Strömungen (cultural flows), stellt eine zusätzliche Herausforderung dar.

Gegenstand der Lehrveranstaltung ist es, die wesentlichen Standpunkte, Argumente und Debatten kennen zu lernen, die in der Ethnologie und in ihren Nachbardisziplinen zur Ästhetik als einer sozialen/kulturellen Kategorie entwickelt wurden. Dabei sollen folgende Themen behandelt werden: der Ansatz der Kunstethnologie, ethnologische Untersuchungen zur Alltagsästhetik, Ästhetik als Ideologie, ästhetische Theorie in Indien (rasa-Lehre), Ästhetisierung als moderne Erfindung, die Selbstvermarktung "indigener" Kunst im internationalen Kunstmarkt, das Konzept des kulturellen Blicks, Nachahmung und Erfindung in der interkulturellen Bildrezeption.

Ziel der Lehrveranstaltung ist es, die jeweiligen Ansätze, Thesen und Erkenntnisse in ihrem Entstehungszusammenhang nachzuvollziehen, um sie dann vor dem Hintergrund aktueller transkultureller Phänomene kritisch zu diskutieren. Dabei stellen sich diverse Fragen: Unterwelchen Rahmenbedingungen können kulturspezifische Ästhetiken identifiziert werden? Welche transkulturellen Strömungen lassen sich nachzeichnen? Wer eignet sich unter welchen Umständen was für ästhetische Formen an und warum? Inwieweit trägt der globale Kunstmarkt, aber auch die akademische Forschung dazu bei, Asymmetrien herauszubilden und zu verstärken?

Winter Semester 2010/11 - PD Dr. Beatrix Hauser

Übung
Zur Ethnographie medialer Praxen: Visuelle Methoden und Formen der Befragung  

Die Medienethnologie befasst sich u.a. mit den Konventionen (audio-)visueller Kommunikation, mit der Visualisierung kultureller Vorstellungen sowie mit dem Mediengebrauch als einer kulturellen Praxis. Ziel der Lehrveranstaltung ist es, zentrale Erhebungsmethoden für die empirische Untersuchung dieser Themenbereiche in Theorie und Praxis kennen zu lernen.Vermittelt werden dabei verschiedene, im Rahmen ethnologischer Feldforschung relevante Techniken der Gesprächsführung und - auswertung: sowohl eher freie, kaum strukturierte Formen (z.B. narratives Interview, Gruppendiskussion) als auch strukturierte, standardisierte Verfahren (z.B. Leitfadeninterview, Fragebogen). Erörtert werden Aspekte der Vorbereitung, Durchführung, Aufzeichnung, Übersetzbarkeit, Performanz, Kontextualisierung und Interpretation. Im Vordergrund steht dabei der jeweilige Nutzen eines Verfahrens für medienethnologische Fragestellungen sowie bei der Verwendung und Auswertung visueller Daten während der Feldforschung.Das Format dieser Lehrveranstaltung ist das einer Übung, in deren Mittelpunkt studentische Unterviewprojekte zu selbst gewählten medienethnologischen Themen stehen. Diese Interviewprojekte sollen sich im Lebensumfeld der TeilnehmerInnen durchführen lassen. Denkbar wären z.B. Befragungen zu Themen wie "Mediennutzung" von/bei XY", "Die Gestaltung von Fotoalben", "Partnersuche im Internet", "Handynutzung im Nahverkehr",  "Rezeption von Graffitis", Sammelleidenschaft" etc.

Winter Semester 2010/11 - Cathrine Bublatzky M.A.

Seminar
Anthropology of Art in a global context  

This seminar deals with contemporary artistic production, the global circulation of artworks and the practices of display in museums or galleries but also in public spaces. Exploring key concepts and approaches within the discipline of anthropology, we will elaborate on questions such as the flows of art works on a global scale, the tensions and power relations between artists, art experts, and art markets or cultural management and how we can investigate these from an anthropological perspective. What do we make of emerging - and declining - 'trends' such as African, Latin American, Australian, Chinese or Indian contemporary art? In which way can we discuss and analyze the production and circulation of different kind of art genres (e.g. street art, fine art, ethnic art) and cultural origin within a social (global) field?

In order to apply major theories and methods within the Anthropology of Art, this course will give students the possibility to analyze and work with images more practically: students will work in single or collaborative projects on research material (provided by young scholars) in image-data bases not only to collect and archive images but also to add metadata and comment (cross-tagging) on artworks. The seminar will be conducted partly as an elearning course on moodle as well as a joint teaching course and will furthermore include a small student workshop where the projects will jointly present and discuss.

Winter Semester 2010/11 - Laila Abu-Er-Rub M.A.

Seminar
Gender und Werbung: Frauenbilder in Indien
 

Seit Erving Goffman in den siebziger Jahren seine Analyse zu Frauenbildern in der Werbung "Gender Advertisements" vorlegte, ist dieses Thema ein gut erforschter Bereich in den Sozialwissenschaften. In der Ethnologie fehlt es jedoch bislang noch an entsprechenden Untersuchungen. Ohnehin wurde Werbung generell in diesem Fach lange vernachlässigt. Bis zum heutigen Tage gib es nur vereinzelt Ethnographien zu diesem Thema, obwohl es wahrscheinlich  weltweit nur noch wenige Kulturen gibt, die nicht unter dem Einfluss der stetig wachsenden kommerziellen Bilderflut stehen.

In der Repräsentation von Männern und Frauen in der Werbung werden Geschlechter-Ideale sichtbar. In den Werbebildern spiegelt sich also das, was es heißt "eine richtige Frau" oder "ein ganzer Mann" zu sein. In diesem Seminar werden genau diese Ideale und deren Wandel mit einem regionalen Fokus auf Indien in den Blick genommen. Es werden sowohl Theorien zum Thema Gender und Werbung vorgestellt als auch Methoden zur Bildanalyse. Die Teilnehmer sollen anhand einer eigenen Untersuchung von Werbebildern die gelesenen Texte vertiefen.

Summer Semester 2010: Prof. Dr. Christiane Brosius, Prof. Dr. Monica Juneja and Prof. Dr. Melanie Trede

Interdisciplinary Graduate Seminar
Multi-centered Modernisms: Reconfiguring Asian Art of the 20th and 21st Centuries 

This graduate seminar is coupled with a lecture series organised within the framework of the cluster of excellence, Asia and Europe in a Global Context, “Multi-centred modernisms – reconfiguring Asian art of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.” An associated panel discussion at the Deutsch-Amerikanisches Institut Heidelberg, “Institutions, Markets, Publics – contemporary art practice in Asia and Europe” will conclude the series. The lectures and a report of the panel discussion will be published. 

The interdisciplinary seminar brings together the disciplines of art history and visual/media anthropology, with the objective of enabling students to explore the question of modernity in art from different theoretical and methodological perspectives. Sessions will be organized around readings proposed by the guest speakers in conjunction with their lectures. The texts will be made available to participants in advance. One (or two) participants will present these texts during each session in conjunction with the speakers, tie them up with the issues emerging from the previous evening’s lecture, and initiate a discussion.

Summer Semester 2010: Prof. Dr. Christiane Brosius and Dr. Karin Polit

Seminar
Youth and Media

Ever since the 1960s Youth Culture has been of interest to sociologists, anthropologists and political scientists alike. Here, the focus has been on the revolutionary power of youth subcultures. The impact of young people and the subcultures of the Young on mainstream culture has, however, long been neglected. In this seminar we will take a closer look at different groups of young people in Asia and see how they are influenced by and influence the social worlds they live in through and by different types of media. We will, for example analyse Bollywood and Asian diasporic movies in terms of youth culture, youth imaginary and gender, we will look at how the rapid arrival of the mobile phone in Asia has influenced the way young people communicate and construct themselves in Nepal, India, Bangladesh and China, and take a closer look at the influence of young people on Asian music and vice versa.  

In this seminar you will read theoretical texts concerning the anthropology of youth and learn about special requirements of researching children and young people with respect to Media. You will read and discuss texts that have Youth and Media as a focus and learn about the special concerns of Youth in general but especially in Asia.

Summer Semester 2010: Cathrine Bublatzky M.A.

Seminar:
Theory and Practice in Visual Anthropology – How do anthropologists work with images of art and popular culture?

The discipline of Anthropology faces a new urgency in approaching an extensive transcultural and transnational migration of visual items in recent times. This urgency results from an increasing flow of visualities across the globe caused by diverse forms of usage and exhibition practices as well as different kinds of new media and technologies. This seminar shall show how anthropologists engage with visual items from Indian contemporary art and popular culture in order to investigate the question how these visualities are used in transcultural and transnational negotiation processes of culture and identity in a global context.

Not all images are as famous to the public as for example the Danish Mohammad cartoons but have still an important role within cultural exchange processes. What is exactly happening within these transformation processes? How and by whom are aesthetic images or popular products used or even exploited for identity creation and/or in engaging with other social groups?

Winter Semester 2009/10: Prof. Dr. Christiane Brosius and Hans-Martin Kunz, M.A.

Graduate Seminar:
Fusion Films: Transcultural flows between Indian and Western cinema

Hardly any medium is as crucial for the understanding of transnational cultural flows as cinema. One aim of this seminar is therefore to analyze the different patterns and types of flows between and through American/European and Indian cinema. Some of the topics discussed will include the popularization of Western music and action cinema through Indian B-movies, Bollywood audiences in Africa, the Arab world and the former Soviet Union, the construction of an national identity among Indian diasporic communities in the UK and USA, the work of Indian diasporic film makers such as Mira Nair and Deepa Mehta through a transcultural perspective, the representation of India in European/ American feature films as well as documentaries and its interrelationship with tourism, the influence of Russian film makers and Italian neo-realist cinema on elitist intellectual films in India, Hollywood play with Bollywood styles in films such as 'Moulin Rouge', and last but not least newer European/Indian co-projects such as 'Slumdog Millionaire', 'Brick Lane' and Florian Gallenberger’s 'Schatten der Zeit'. The seminar will be further enriched by a lecture on Chinese fusion cinema. 

Winter Semester 2009/10: Prof. Dr. Christiane Brosius and Dr. Nic Leonhardt

Graduate Seminar:
Weltstädte – Stadtwelten: transkulturelle Perspektiven auf Urbanisierung


World-Cities, Mega-Städte und Metropolen sind seit einigen Jahren Forschungsgegenstand  vieler Disziplinen. Städte sind Drehkreuze und Umschlagplätze für globale Bewegungen und eignen sich als Fallstudien für vielfältige Untersuchungen sozialer Veränderungen und kultureller Praktiken. Das Seminar bringt grundlegende theoretische Ansätze der Stadtethnologie und Urban Studies näher und erweitert sie durch eine komparative Perspektive, die vor allem asiatische Städte mit in Betracht ziehen. Am Beispiel von Metropolen wie Shanghai, Neu Delhi, Bombay und Berlin werden Transformationen der Städte, ethnische und soziale Gruppen, street culture, Regulation der öffentlichen Räume sowie Events und Stadtmarketing behandelt. Arbeitsformen sind Einzel- und Gruppenarbeiten sowie Kleinprojekte.  Für den Erhalt eines qualifizierten Scheines sind Referat, Hausarbeit und regelmässige Teilnahme Voraussetzung.

Summer Semester 2009: PD Dr. Christiane Brosius and Simone Heidbrink M.A.

Interdisciplinary Graduate Seminar:
Medienethnologie im "Global Village": Interdisziplinäre Ansätze zur Ritualforschung in virtuellen Welten


Virtuelle 3D Welten erfreuen sich in der derzeitigen Medien-Landschaft großer Beliebtheit, wie rund 16 Millionen registrierte Avatare in Second Life, der derzeit größten dieser "Life Sims", nachdrücklich belegen. Da diese Plattformen im Gegensatz zu klassischen Online Spielen wie World of Warcraft  kein festgelegtes Spielziel aufweisen, sind die Nutzer gefordert, dort selbst Gegenstände, Inhalte und somit im weitesten Sinne 'Sinn' zu generieren. Neben kommunikativen, ludischen, ästhetischen und vielen anderen Aspekten weisen virtuelle 3D Welten auch eine große Bandbreite von religiösen Angeboten auf, was neue Herausforderungen an Theorien und Methoden kulturwissenschaftlicher Internetforschung stellt. Die Möglichkeit, in Echtzeit mit Nutzern dieser religiösen Offerten zu kommunizieren und an deren religiösen Praktiken zu partizipieren erfordert eine Ausweitung der bisherigen, im wesentlichen text- und bildwissenschaftlich orientierten Herangehensweisen um ethnographische und medienethnologische Methoden.
Eine Zusammenarbeit von Ethnologie und Religionswissenschaft soll die Vermittlung eines möglichst breiten multimethodischen Theorie- und Methodenspektrum der rezenten Forschung in diesem Bereich an konkreten Beispielen gewährleisten und somit Synergieeffekte für die Studierenden der Ethnologie und der Religionswissenschaft schaffen. Eine Schwerpunktsetzung auf Online-Rituale soll zudem den Mehrwert moderner ritualtheoretischer Forschungszugänge aus dem Sonderforschungsbereich 619 „Ritualdynamik“ in die Lehre tragen. Die Studierenden erhalten die Möglichkeit deren praktischen Anwendung in den beiden Praxisblöcken in Form kleinerer Feldforschungsprojekte austesten. Als Schlüsselthemen werden Ritualtheorie, Methoden und Praxisbeispiele virtueller Ethnographie und Forschungsethik behandelt.
Als Leistungsnachweise sollen neben einer Projektarbeit, die als kleines Feldforschungsprojekt innerhalb von Second Life konzipiert ist von jedem Studierenden 2 Essays mit jeweils einem theoretischen und einem praktischen Fokus verfasst werden, die auf http://webreligion.wordpress.com/category/medienethnologie/ veröffentlicht und diskutiert werden sollen.

Summer Semester 2009: PD Dr. Christiane Brosius, Prof. Dr. Melanie Trede, Prof. Dr. Barbara Mittler

Interdisciplinary Seminar/Graduate Seminar:
Visualizing Gender and the Body in a Global Context

This interdisciplinary course discusses how the categories of gender, sexuality and body have been visualized in various time periods, regions (Japan, China, India) and media (e.g. print, painting, film, performance, exhibitions). We will study the ways in which, for instance, “the Exotic/Oriental body” or the “colonized body” have been depicted and institutionalized in Western media, for Western eyes and audiences. While it seems as if the entities of ‘Self’ and ‘Other’ were relatively static, this seminar seeks theoretical, visual as well as empirical support for the claim that we have to consider highly complex and historically specific coding of bodies, genders and sexualities. This can be done by analyzing the conditions of indigenous traditions as well as the dynamics of social and transcultural interactions (e.g. between Japan/China/India and Europe).
The seminar focuses on studies of relevant theoretical texts on gender and visuality, specific case studies, and preparations for the two international one-day workshops (and the preceding keynote speeches) organized by the Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context” on the topics of “Theorizing Gender in a Transcultural World” and ”Representations of Sexualities in Asian and European Cultures“.

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