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Prof. Dr. Monica Juneja

Lecture

Between Asia and Europe - Islamic art in its global and local dimensions

What does the term "Islamic" mean when used as an adjective to qualify the noun "art"? Did religious tenets impart a unitary character to art forms that spanned vast regions across Asia and Europe over many centuries? To what extent was artistic expression shaped by the proscription of images in Muslim theological opinion? This course addresses these and other related issues that emerge from a long tradition of scholarship on Islamic art. It will look at case studies from different regions of Asia and Southern Europe where Muslim culture was refracted through the prism of many local cultures, making these regions the site of multi-layered, transcultural entanglements. Another set of themes centres around the modern engagement with Islamic art since the Enlightenment – scholarly practice, collecting, museum displays and international exhibitions.

Thursdays, 9 to 11am, IEK HS

 

Seminar

Multi-centered modernisms - reconfiguring Asian art of the 20th and 21st centuries
(co-taught with Prof. Dr. Melanie Trede, Prof. Dr. Christiane Brosius, and Franziska Koch).

This graduate seminar is coupled with a lecture series organised within the framework of the Cluster of Excellence Asia and Europe in a Global Context with the same title. An associated panel discussion at the Deutsch-Amerikanisches Institut Heidelberg, "Institutions, Markets, Publics – contemporary art practice in Asia and Europe" will conclude the series, see more information here.

Some of the lectures are published in the Cluster's e-journal of Transcultural Studies

See for more details of the whole lecture series: http://www.asia-europe.uni-heidelberg.de/en/research/d-historicities-heritage/d13.html

In spite of an expanding global art market and the increasing resonance of Asian art in the Western world, most non-European art practice remains caught in the paradox of having to participate in a universal notion of the modern, while attempting to "catch up" in an asymmetrical game of progress. Discussions of modern Asian art have been by and large mired in early historiographic constructions of modernity as a European preserve, while visual culture emanating from beyond the frontiers of Europe was dismissed as "derivative" of particular Euro-American styles and movements. The lecture series –which develops and extends the themes of the course "Modernism as a global process" (Juneja Winter Semester 2009-10) - hopes to bring forth fresh discussions on visual practices that have their roots in multiple locations in Europe and Asia and attempt to create visions of the modern through the engagement of local particularity with the universal – and in the process de-centre that universal. The panel discussion will focus on the role of institutions that make up an expanding global public sphere for the arts – such as the art market, art collections, transnational networks of artists, as well as international exhibitions. Experts and practitioners from these fields will engage with a number of issues germane to our understanding of modernism. 
The interdisciplinary seminar brings together the disciplines of art history and visual/media anthropology, with the objective of enabling students to explore the question of modernity in art from different theoretical and methodological perspectives. Sessions will be organized around readings proposed by the guest speakers in conjunction with their lectures. The texts will be made available to participants in advance. One (or two) participants will present these texts during each session in conjunction with the speakers, tie them up with the issues emerging from the previous evening’s lecture, and initiate a discussion.

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Dr.-Ing. Mag. Michael Falser

(Pro)Seminar

Displaying the self and the other. Architecture and representation in World and Colonial Exhibitions from 1851 until the present

World and Colonial Exhibitions since the 19th century until today belong to the most spectacular public events worldwide. Conceived as a temporally limited presentation of power of the hosting nation, these exhibitions remained a long time unsurpassed as regards their staging efforts in the scale of site and its architecture, costs of infrastructure, event organisation and media presence. Today, they are unique documents of the time-specific perception and display of culture in general.

The course intends to discuss the various modes of presentation and the specific ways of display/presentation the self and the other with case-studies of selected exhibitions in Europe/USA (from London 1851, Vienna, Amsterdam, Paris, Chicago, Marseilles, Cologne, New York, Antwerps to Hannover 2000) and Asia (from Osaka/Japan 1970 and South Corea  to Shanghai 2010).
Methodologically, the course follows a threefold approach by the analysis of a) the ephemeral architectural forms and branding images like the Christal Palace to the Eiffel Tower, 1:1-scale replicas of the Rue du Caire or Angkor Vat and contemporary High-Tech-architecture, b) the concepts and contents/objects of the exhibitions from modern achievements of the West to indigenous-traditional exhibits of supposedly undevelopped parts of the world, and c) the social and live entertainment with the ethnographic display of exotic/primitive indigenous groups and native villages to the contemporary amusement industry.

Being a course of the Heidelberg Research Cluster "Asia and Europe in a Global Context", the didactic focus lies in the discussion of the persisting stereotyping the self and the other between the East and the West, resp. Asia and Europe in the course of the European-colonial mission the civilize barbarity, national post-war independence and finally the contemporary globalisation of culture.

April 21, 2010, 3 to 8pm, IEK klÜR
June 13, 20 and 27, 2010, 10am to 6pm, IEK klÜR

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Franziska Koch

(Pro)Seminar

Exhibiting Asian Contemporary Art in the West

The strikingly large number of exhibitions of contemporary Asian art in prestigious European and American museums is a recent phenomenon. The Western reception of contemporary art created in countries such as Japan, Taiwan, South Korea, China and India has broadened significantly during the post-cold war era: it has been accelerated through the media revolution and economic globalization, both factors which have fuelled the rapid rise of these Asian nations. Large panoramic exhibitions, effectively advertised and marketed, are pivotal to transcultural artistic movements and the processes of mediation between Asia and the West.  Such exhibitions not only introduce works and artists from Asia, but attempt to present to viewers in the West the artistic discourses, historical and cultural backgrounds as well as the contemporary socio-political contexts within which art production in Asia is rooted.

The proseminar will examine these exhibitions from a threefold critical perspective: it will explore the systematising, historical and theoretical aspects of transcultural exhibition practices in the age of globalization. The sessions will focus on a close analysis and comparison of the exhibition concepts, the legitimating strategies  of the curators, the selection of the exhibits and of the catalogue commentaries. An important question to be addressed is: What do these shows reveal about the cultural, institutional and historical frameworks of their organizers as they do about the displayed art of “the others”.

The proseminar includes a one-day-excursion in connection with the exhibition "Artful Resistance. Contemporary Art from Sri Lanka" at the Museum der Weltkulturen in Frankfurt a. M.

 

Seminar

Multi-centered modernisms - reconfiguring Asian art of the 20th and 21st centuries
(co-taught with Prof. Dr. Melanie Trede, Prof. Dr. Christiane Brosius, and Franziska Koch).

For more information, see above (Juneja)

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