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Eva Ambos

born 3.3.1981 in Ottweiler/Germany 
1/2008 Magister in Ethnology and History; winter term 2008/09: teaching assignment Univ. of Tübingen “Introduction to Medical Anthropology II”, assistance seminar “Ethnography of Sri Lanka” (Prof. William Sax), Univ. of Heidelberg; summer term 2009: teaching assignment Univ. of Tübingen "Medical Anthropology and Modernity"; 4/2005 - 12/2008 Tutorin; 3/2008 - 12/2008: Student assistant, SFB 619; 11/2008 - 12/2008: Student assistant, Cluster "Asia and Europe"; June - August 2006: volunteering in Sri Lanka (NGO Sarvodaya, DAAD-sponsorship), small fieldwork about healing rituals which was integrated in the Magister thesis   

Since January 2009: PhD-candidate at the Cluster "Asia and Europe", Project B 14 "Religion on Stage" at the Univ. of Heidelberg; Topic of the thesis: Transformation and Nationalisation of Healing Rituals in Sri Lanka (Working title: "Media, Globalization and Modernity in Sinhalese Subaltern Performances")

Amelia Bonea

Amelia Bonea has a B.A. and M.A. in Asian Area Studies from the University of Tokyo. Her research interests are broad and interdisciplinary and include the modern history of South Asia with a focus on journalism and the history of communications, indentured labour migration and the Indian diaspora, language ideologies and media discourse analysis. She is currently pursuing a doctoral degree at the Cluster of Excellence ‘Asia and Europe in a Global Context’, University of Heidelberg, on the topic of telegraphy and press in nineteenth-century India. 

Christiane Brosius

With a background in Cultural and Social Anthropology, Art History and Art Education, and having studied in Frankfurt, Oxford and London, Brosius worked on and published about the cultural historian Aby Warburg (Hamburg, Germany) in her Masters Thesis (1999). For her book Empowering Visions, A Study on Videos and the Politics of Cultural Nationalism in India (London: Anthem Press 2005), Brosius explored the iconography, rhetoric and production context of video propaganda of the Hindu Right (especially late 1980s to 1990s). A post-doctoral project took her to the South Pacific where she explored silent films made by missionaries, explorers and travellers. Her latest book will be out in September 2009, entitled India's Middle Class. New Forms of Urban Leisure, Consumption and Prosperity (Routledge New Delhi), with case studies about real estate advertising and urbanisation, religious leisure parks, heritage tourism, themed weddings, lifestyle specialists and magazines. Aditional research interests are urban anthropology, diaspora studies and ritual performance. Brosius heads a research project entitled "Agency and territorial Rituals in India" (Collaborative Research Centre of Ritual Studies, Heidelberg). She is co-founder of Tasveer Ghar/House of Pictures: A Digital Network of South Asian Popular Visual Culture which is now, in the context of the Cluster initiative, being expanded towards other Asian and Middle Eastern countries.

Alexandra Chang

Alexandra Chang is the Director of Public Programs & Research Manager at the Asian/Pacific/American Institute research center at NYU. She is the co-organizer for the Diasporic Asian Art Network and the project lead of the East Coast Asian American Art Project, a collaborative research and archival initiative based at NYU. Her book Envisioning Diaspora: Asian American Visual Arts Collectives was released internationally by Timezone 8 Limited with project partner A/P/A Institute at New York University in 2009. She has curated exhibitions and written on contemporary art, graffiti, design and architecture, including co-curating the current exhibition “Art, Archives, and Activism: Martin Wongʼs Downtown Crossings” at the 7th Floor Gallery at New York University (March-December 2009). She has served as the Managing Editor for Art Asia Pacific magazine and Features Editor for amNew York. Her writing has appeared in Art Asia Pacific, ArtKrush, Asiance magazine, Art in Asia, amNew York, Time Magazine, Chicago Tribune, Boston Globe among other publications. She has recently written monograph essays on the artists Tomokazu Matsuyama and José Parla, and is a contributor to the forthcoming Oxford University Press Encyclopedia for American Art. Chang holds a Masterʼs from the NYU John W. Draper Interdisciplinary Masterʼs Program in Humanities and Social Thought with a concentration in Aesthetics and Asian American Art History.

Susanne Enderwitz

Susanne Enderwitz, Prof. Dr., graduated in Islamic and Religious Studies at the Free University of Berlin. She spent several years in Alexandria, Paris and Jerusalem. From 1984 to 1989, she worked as assistant at the Free University, and from 1991 to 1998 as assistant professor. She obtained her PhD in 1992 and finished her "Habilitation" in 2001. In 2002, she was appointed professor for Arab and Islamic Studies at Heidelberg university. Her main subjects are classical and modern Arabic literature, classical and modern Middle Eastern History and Religious Studies with a focus on Islam.

Hans Harder

Hans Harder has been Professor and Head of the Department of Modern South Asian Languages and Literatures at the South Asia Institute, Heidelberg University, since 2007. His research interests include modern South Asian literatures, colonial and postcolonial intellectual history of South Asia, and religious developments on the subcontinent, especially modern Hinduism and (Bengali) Islam. Among his forthcoming books is a monograph entitled "Sufism, Saint Veneration and Bengali Islam: The Maijbhandaris of Chittagong", and a volume on the literary historiography of modern Indian literatures. He is currently working on colonial satire in modern South Asian languages in the context of the Cluster.

Alexander Henn

Alexander Henn

Alexander Henn is Associate Professor at the Arizona State University in Phoenix Arizona holding a joint position in the Department of Religious Studies and the School of Global Studies. Trained as a cultural anthropologist he works on religious pluralism and cultural encounter in colonial and post-colonial India and, in particular, Goa. Among his recent publication are Wachheit der Wesen. Politik, Ritual und Kunst der Akkulturation in Goa (2003) and Rituals in an Unstable World: Contingency, Embodiment, Hybridity (edited 2008).

Madeleine Herren-Oesch

Madeleine Herren-Oesch

Madeleine Herren-Oesch, Co-director of the Cluster since 2007, joined the University of Heidelberg in October 2004 and holds the chair in modern history at the History Department. Her research interests are transnational history and historiography, transfer of knowledge and global history, the League of Nations' system and the participation of Asian states, world's fairs, exhibitions and congresses in the 19th and 20th centuries. Her recent book discusses the history of international organisations (Madeleine Herren, Internationale Organisationen seit 1865. Eine Globalgeschichte der internationalen Ordnung, Darmstadt 2009). Within the Cluster, she directs among others a research project on international organisations ("Networking the International System"), and with Barbara Mittler a project on migration of encyclopedic knowledge ("Hidden Grammars of Transculturality")

Monica Juneja

Monica Juneja

Monica Juneja is Professor of Global Art History in the Excellence Cluster Asia and Europe in a Global Perspective, University of Heidelberg. She has taught at the Universities of Delhi, Hannover, Vienna and at Emory University, Atlanta. Her research and writing focus on transculturality and visual representation, disciplinary practices in the art history of Western Europe and South Asia, Christianisation and religious identities in early modern South Asia. Her publications include Peindre le paysan. L’image rurale dans la peinture française de Millet à Van Gogh (Paris 1998), Architecture in medieval India. Forms, Contexts, Histories (Reader South Asia. Histories and Interpretations, 2001), The lives of objects in pre-modern societies (2006 edited together with Gabriela Signori), BildGeschichten. Das Verhältnis von Bild und Text in den Berichten zu auβereuropäischen Welten (Theme issue of Zeitenblicke, 2008, edited together with Barbara Potthast), Religion und Grenzen in Indien und Deutschland: Auf dem Weg zu einer transnationalen Historiografie (edited with Margrit Pernau, 2009). She is editor of The Medieval History Journal, a member of the editorial collective of the Werkstatt Geschichte and editor of the series Visual and Media Histories (Routledge India).

Nic Leonhardt

Nic Leonhardt

Nic Leonhardt studied Theatre Studies and Audiovisual Media, German Philology, Art History and Musicology at the Universities of Erlangen-Nürnberg and Mainz. She completed her M.A. with a dissertation on Stereography and Theatre (2000). From 2002 to 2005, Nic was participant in the International PhD-program Performance and Media Studies, University of Mainz. (title of her PhD-thesis: Pictorial Dramaturgy. Theatre and Visual Culture in 19th Century Germany (1869-1899)). She worked as a research associate in the collaborative research centers (SfB) Theatralität and Kulturelle Repräsentationen von Fremdheit im 19. Jahrhundert. In 2006 and 2007, she was a research associate and lecturer at the University of Music and Theatre in Leipzig, Germany. In  2007, she acted as a guest professor at the German Department of Barnard College and Columbia University, New York City (with an additional grant by the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD)). Nic is currently working as content manager and lecturer with the Cluster’s Graduate Program for Transcultural Studies, and is a PostDoc in the research project Difference, Danger and New Urban Imaginaries. She has researched and published on theatre and media history and historiography, visual culture, stereography, telenovelas, media and theatre censorship and urban history. Nic Leonhardt received grants from the University of Mainz, the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), the German Research Foundation (DFG), and is a Fulbright alumna. Besides her academic work, she works as a freelance writer (primarily on sports).

Sun Liying

Sun Liying

Sun Liying is a PhD candidate at institute of Chinese Studies, University of Heidelberg. She focuses on the history of dissemination of transcultural nudes and naked bodies as well as the perception of new body culture both in elite and popular discourses in China between the 1910s and 1930s. She has worked as Chinese language teacher and research assistant for several projects, such as "The Common People and the Artist in the 1930s", "A literary biography of the Late Qing/Republican period woman poet Lü Bicheng (1883-1943)" and "A New Approach to the Popular Press in China: Gender and Cultural Production, 1904-1937". She holds a Masters degree in History from Nankai University, China. Currently she is working as research member for Cluster project "Rethinking Trends" (B12)

Sarat Maharaj

Sarat Maharaj

Sarat Maharaj was born and educated in South Africa during the Apartheid years.  He did his PhD in Britain on  ‘The Dialectic of Modernism and Mass Culture: Studies in Post War British Art’. Professor of History & Theory of Art at Goldsmiths, London 1980 -2005, where he is now Visiting Research Professor, he is currently Professor of Visual Art & Knowledge Systems, Lund University & the Malmo Art Academies, Sweden. He was the first Rudolf Arnheim Professor, Humboldt University, Berlin (2001-02) and Research Fellow at the Jan Van Eyck Akademie, Maastricht (1999-2001). His specialist research and publications focus on Marcel Duchamp, James Joyce and Richard Hamilton. His writing covers: Visual Art as Knowledge Production & Non-Knowledge; Textiles, Cultural Translation and the ‘convergence’ of image, sound, movement and consciousness studies (Knowledge Labs 2005 & 2006, Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin with Liu Sola (New York/Beijing) and Kofi Koko (Paris. Benin) and New Media Art (Banff, Canada 2007). He led the Visual Arts Knowledge Lab, Toronto, May 2009. With Okwui Enwezor, he was co-curator of Documenta X1 (Kassel. 2002). With Richard Hamilton and Ecke Bonk, he curated ‘Retinal. Optical. Visual. Conceptual on Marcel Duchamp’ (Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam. 2002). He was co-curator of ‘Farewell to Postcolonialism’ … Towards a Post-Western Modernity’, Guangzhou Triennial, 2008 and editor/curator: Printed Projects (Dublin) ‘Querying the GT 2008’, Republic of Ireland/Northern Ireland pavilion, Venice Biennale, 2009.  

Nicholas Mirzoeff

Nicholas Mirzoeff

Nicholas Mirzoeff is Professor of Media, Culture and Communication at New York University. His work is in the field of visual culture. In recent years it has fallen into four main areas.

First, he has been working on the genealogy of visuality, a key term in the field. Far from being a postmodern theory word, it was created to describe how Napoleonic era generals “visualized” a battlefield that they could not see. Applied to the social as a whole by Thomas Carlyle, visuality was a conservative strategy to oppose all emancipations and liberations in the name of the autocratic hero. His book 'The Right to Look: A Counterhistory of Visuality' is forthcoming with Duke University Press (2010).
Second, he produces texts and projects that support the general development of visual culture as a field of study and a methodology. The second fully revised edition of An Introduction to Visual Culture will come out in Summer 2009 from Routledge, with color illustrations throughout and new sections of Keywords and Key Images.
Third, he works closely with contemporary artists. Most recently, he worked with Carl Pope on the “Mind of Cleveland” public art project in Cleveland OH; and with Jeremy Deller on “It is What It is: Conversations About Iraq” at the New Museum in New York.

Finally, he is beginning a new project on the visual culture of climate change in conjunction with the not-for-profit Islands First.  

Sumathi Ramaswamy

Sumathi Ramaswamy

Sumathi Ramaswamy is Professor of History at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina.  Prior to this appointment, she was Professor of History at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and Assistant Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.  She studied for her M.A. and M. Phil in ancient Indian history at the Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India.  She also has a Master’s in Anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania, and graduated with a Ph. D. in History from the University of California, Berkeley.  She is the author of Passions of the Tongue: Language Devotion in Tamil India, 1891-1970 (University of California Press, 1997) and The Lost Land of Lemuria: Fabulous Geographies, Catastrophic Histories (University of California Press, 2004).  She has also edited a volume entitled Beyond Appearances? Visual Practices and Ideologies in Modern India (Sage, 2003). A new monograph, The Goddess and the Nation: Mapping Mother India, will be published in Spring 2010 by Duke University Press, and she is currently working on a project entitled “Global Itineraries: The Indian Travels of a Worldly Object.” She is also co-founder of a trans-national digital network for popular South Asian visual culture called Tasveer Ghar.

Timon Screech

Timon Screech

Timon Screech was born in Birmingham, UK, and received a BA (Hons.) in Oriental Studies (Japanese) at Oxford, before completing his Ph.D at Harvard in 1991. He also studied at the universities of Geneva and Gakushuin. He has taught the history of Japanese art at SOAS, University of London, since 1991, and in 2006 was elected to a chair in the History of Art. He is concurrently Permanent Visiting Professor at Tama Art University, Tokyo.
Screech is the author of some ten books on the visual culture of the Edo period. His PhD book, The Lens Within the Heart: The Western Scientific Gaze and Popular Imagery in Later Edo Japan, first published in 1996, is still in print, in a second edition (Curzon 2002). Most recently, he has introduced and edited Japan Extolled and Decried: Carl Peter Thunberg and the Shogun’s Realm, 1775-1796 (Routledge, 2005), and Secret Memoirs of the Shoguns: Isaac Titsingh and Japan, 1779-1822 (Routledge, 2006). His writings have been translated into French, Japanese, Korean, Polish and Romanian. In the first of gender studies, his best-know book is Sex and the Floating World: Erotic Images in Japan, 1700-1820 (Reaktion, 1999).   

Ajay Sinha

Ajay Sinha

Ajay J. Sinha is Associate Professor in the Art History and Film Studies Programs at Mount Holyoke College, U.S.A.  Recipient of research fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, American Philosophical Society, the American Institute of Indian Studies, and Mount Holyoke College, he has authored Imagining Architects:  Creativity in Indian Temple Architecture (Newark, University of Delaware Press and London, Associated University Presses, 2000), published journal articles on India's ancient religious architecture and Contemporary Indian Art, and co-edited a volume of essays on Indian film titled Bollyworld:  Popular Indian Cinema through a Transnational Lens.

(edited by Raminder Kaur and Ajay J. Sinha, New Delhi and London, Sage Publications, 2005).  

Patricia Uberoi

Patricia Uberoi

Patricia Uberoi has held teaching and research positions in Sociology at the University of Delhi and the Jawaharlal Nehru University, and at the Institute of Economic Growth, Delhi.  She was formerly honorary director of the Institute of Chinese Studies (Centre for the Study of Developing Societies), Delhi, where she continues to remain involved with India-China comparative studies and overseeing a project on regional development in Northeast India, Southwest China, Bangladesh and Myanmar.

Dr. Uberoi is currently engaged in research on family, kinship, marriage and gender, and on aspects of popular culture and social policy in reference to both India and China.  She has published widely on these themes, including Freedom and destiny: Gender, family and popular culture in India (Oxford University Press, 2006), Family, kinship and marriage in India (edited, Oxford University Press, 1993), Social reform, sexuality and the state (edited, Sage Publications, 1996) and, most recently, Rise of the Asian giants:  Dragon-elephant tango (Kolkata, Anthem Press, 2008).  She has also co-edited Tradition, pluralism and identity: In honour of T.N. Madan (Sage Publications, 1999), Anthropology in the East:  Founders of Indian Sociology and Anthropology (Permanent Black, 2007) and Marriage, Migration and Gender (Sage Publications, 2008).  She was Co-editor of the journal, Contributions to Indian sociology (1992-2006), and is on the editorial board of several other academic journals.  

Mio Wakita

Mio Wakita

Mio Wakita is a PhD candidate in Japanese Art History at Heidelberg University where she also worked as an assistant professor from 2004 to 2008. BA in political science (Keio University, Toyko), M.A. in western and east asian art history and Japanese studies (University of Bonn).  

Roland Wenzlhuemer

Roland Wenzlhuemer

Roland Wenzlhuemer has studied modern history and communication studies and earned a doctoral degree in history at Salzburg University in 2002. In 2003, he joined the Centre for Modern Oriental Studies in Berlin and then moved on to the Centre for British Studies, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, where he worked as lecturer and researcher in British History from 2005 to 2008. In October 2008, Roland joined the Cluster of Excellence ‘‘Asia and Europe in a Global Context’’ at the University of Heidelberg, where he currently leads a research group on ‘‘Asymmetries in Cultural Information Flows.’’ His research interests lie mainly within colonial history, telecommunications history, and especially wherever there are touching points between the two.  

Catherine Yeh

Catherine Yeh

Catherine Yeh is a professor of Chinese at Boston University. Her research interests are presently in twentieth century Chinese entertainment culture, its political implications and its impact on social change. Her recent publications include a co-edited volume Performing the 'Nation': Gender Politics in Literature, Theatre and the Visual Arts of China and Japan, 1880-1940. (Brill. Co-edited with Doris Croissant, Joshua S. Mostow, 2009). And Shanghai Love: Courtesan, Intellectuals and Entertainment Culture, 1850-1910 (Seattle UWP, 2006). She has just completed book manuscript on the Chinese political novel of the early twentieth century, and is currently working on a project with the working title “The Stuff Stars are Made of: Politics, Mass Media, and the Rise of dan Actors during the Republic Era 1910s-1930s”. 

Eva Zhang

Eva Zhang

Eva Zhang has studied Art History and Japanese Studies at the University of Heidelberg. During her master studies she studied and worked in Japan (e.g Tuebingen University Center for Japanese Language at Dôshisha, Kyôto) and China (e.g. Nankai University, Tianjin). After her M.A. she worked for several companies in China and Germany. Since October 2008 she is a scholarship holder with the ‘Graduate Programme for Transcultural Studies’ at the Cluster of Excellence "Asia and Europe in a Global Context: Shifting Asymmetries in Cultural Flows" at the University of Heidelberg. In her dissertation research (The European perceptions of Japan in 16th and 17th century illustrated travelogues and their reception in the 18th century) she focuses on visual traditions of illustrations on Asia, Early Modern networks of transcultural exchange, the internal and external perceptions of different cultures and the depiction of ‘otherness’.