Sub Navigation

Seite drucken. Seite weiterempfehlen.

Activities of the Project B14 "Religion on Stage"

Past:

 

1.

3rd October 2008:

Workshop Project B 7 (pilot project) “Staging religion: Traditional Performances in new Public Spheres and Media”

Not only languages but also traditional performances are greatly endangered both in Asia and Europe. In Asia, the documentation of such practices has become increasingly relevant for the people and countries concerned and is often understood as acknowledgement of their cultural heritage, sometimes even as source of revitalisation of endangered practices. New media technologies have crucially altered the deployment and significance of such performances. They also contributed to globalise regional performances. Nowadays, traditional South Asian rituals are performed all over Europe and are re-contextualised with remarkable additions and transformations. This project aims to systematically and scientifically analyse this process of media-induced change in public representation in Asia and Europe, ranging from film, video and audio re–cordings to printed images and photographs. Our focus will be on 1. changes in intangible heritage rituals (Vedic recitation, Sanskrit theatre Kutiyattam), the homa-sacrifice and Sri Lankan healing rituals 2. The filmic documentation and the analysis of these rituals in a professional way and 3. the entry of this material in a database and tagging the sequences by developing standardised keywords and a metalanguage based on RDF and OWL. Text and picture not only complement one another in the database, using the tagging-system according to a standardised metalanguage they offer the unique possibility for a very differentiated description and detailed analysis. Especially the study of transcultural flow in a globalised context will be possible in a till today unknown complexity by including all types of new media in the databank.We are going to discuss research-questions as:* How are rituals spread through the new media?* What does the media to the ritual? How is globalisation / media / media as a global player changing rituals?* How is the political economy of performances linked to media?* How do rituals travel? Which rituals travel, which do not travel and why? What makes peoples, rituals to travel? How far is media involved? What does this mean in global terms?* How travels the context and the content of rituals through media globally?* How do notions of rituals change? (ex.: homa as a charity-event)* What makes rituals interesting for people all over the world? 

more info

2.

13th January 2009:

Film screening “World’s Music and My Dance! (Sonsarer Songeet, Aamar Naatch)” (by Vikrant Kishore) with follow-up discussion

Abstract

“World’s music and my Dance!”, a film by Vikrant Kishore, is the third part of a series of films on Chhau Dance, a mask dance drama from the Eastern part of India. The dance repertoire includes elements from mythology, carrying the message of good triumphing over evil. Mainly the tribals and lower caste people from West Bengal, Orissa, and Jharkhand (India) practice Chhau dance. Middle Age warriors called Paikas used to entertain themselves during peacetime by displaying their martial art skills in this dance. Later on, these skills became part of the worship of the Sun god and Lord Shiva during Hindu religious festivals of the area associated with agriculture, rain and the sun. Thus, Hindu religion and ritual were fused with Paika, the warrior dance. The film showcases the journey of a Chhau Dance group from a small village in West Bengal, together with a Rajasthani folk dance group from Jaipur, to Europe. On an invitation from the Association Nationale et Cultures (ANCT, France), the two Indian artist groups traveled extensively throughout France and Switzerland, performing their dances and culture in various international folk festivals and holding dance workshops for local children. The film explores various moments of their journey and captures their emotions and reactions of being in a different part of the world, interacting, and socializing with the local people.
The film screening was followed by a discussion.

-> Link
https://kjc-ws2.kjc.uni-heidelberg.de/events/film-screening-world2019s-music-and-my-dance-by-vikrant-kishore

more info

3.

23rd January 2009:

Film screening “Dancing for Themselves: Manbhum Style” (by Vikrant Kishore) with follow-up discussion

Abstract

“Dancing for themselves”, another film by Vikrant Kishore, is the second part of a series of films on Chhau Dance, a mask dance drama from the Eastern part of India. The dance repertoire includes elements from mythology, carrying the message of good triumphing over evil. Mainly the tribals and lower caste people from West Bengal, Orissa, and Jharkhand (India) practice Chhau dance. Middle Age warriors called Paikas used to entertain themselves during peacetime by displaying their martial art skills in this dance. Later on, these skills became part of the worship of the Sun god and Lord Shiva during Hindu religious festivals of the area associated with agriculture, rain and the sun. Thus, Hindu religion and ritual were fused with Paika, the warrior dance.
“Dancing for themselves: Manbhum Style” deals with the life of two simple yet passionate and dedicated Chhau dancers and musicians, Lalit Mahato and Lambodhar Kalindi. The documentary has a look at their life to bring out the dreams, worries, challenges, ambition, and mostly the love and sincerity for their dance and music. As Lalit says: “When we dance, it’s just not dance, it is as if we’re among the Gods and demons” and later he adds: “Whatever it takes I’ll teach my son Chhau Dance, no matter if I’ve to just eat boiled rice”. This film is an attempt to show the passion that Chhau performers have for their art-form, and the kind of strength the man of the soil has through Lalit and Lambodhar who are the heroes, the dancers and the Gods.
The film has been shot extensively in the villages of West Bengal and Jharkhand, India.
The film screening was followed by a discussion.

-> Link
https://kjc-ws2.kjc.uni-heidelberg.de/events/film-screening-dancing-for-themselves-and-nobody-can-stop-gannat-by-vikrant-kishore 

more info

4.

23rd January 2009:

Film screening “Nobody can stop Gannat!” (by Vikrant Kishore) with follow-up discussion

Abstract

The film showcases the International Folklore Festival of Gannat in France, organized by the National Association Cultures et Traditions (ANCT), where every year folk music and dance groups from more than 35 countries descend to participate in the celebration of the "Heritage of Humanity”. The festival aims to safeguard and to expand traditional and folk cultures as defined by UNESCO.
The festival of ANCT also has a philanthropic approach, in their show of solidarity with the Tsunami affected areas of Sri Lanka, they invited not only a group from Sri Lanka to perform, but they also pledged to help re-build more than 400 houses in the 2004 Tsunami affected village of Kosgoda in Sri Lanka.
The filmmaker, Vikrant Kishore, travels with various folk groups across France, and captures their performance as well as their interaction with the local hosts. The film beautifully displays the rare dance and music forms from countries like Sri Lanka, Polynesia, Bulgaria, Ukraine, Mexico, Spain, Peru, Canada, Cameroon and Brazil to name a few. The film covers the various aspects of the festival and moreover, it gives a glimpse of the folk groups participating in the 33rd edition of the festival.
The film is thus about the cultural heritage of groups and leads to questions about whose property is it, about the role of (transcultural) organizations like UNESCO who try to preserve and define this cultural property, about concepts like “tradition” and “authenticity” and finally about global flows between Europe and other regions of the world, new public spheres as well as the role of new media.
The film screening was followed by a discussion about these topics.

-> Link
https://kjc-ws2.kjc.uni-heidelberg.de/events/film-screening-dancing-for-themselves-and-nobody-can-stop-gannat-by-vikrant-kishore

more info

Filmposter "Nobody can stop Gannat"

5.

27th April 2009:
“Kutiyattam – Sanskrittheatre from Kerala/South India” – A lecture-demonstration by Kalamandalam Rama Chakyar and Heike Moser
and Kutiyattam-Performance

Anknüpfend an Dr. Heike Mosers Teilprojekt in B14 „Religion on Stage“ zum Sanskrittheater Kutiyattam und seiner Ernennung zum immateriellen UNESCO-Weltkulturerbe, ihren am 28.01.2009 in B2 „Creative Dissonances“ gehaltenen Vortrag zum Thema sowie den im letzten Jahr gemeinsam von B14 und B2 organisierten Round-Table zur Oper „Alessandro“ wird der hier anvisierte Vortrag samt Demonstrationen und einer abendlichen Aufführung sicher zu einem der Höhepunkte in Research Area B im Jahr 2009 werden. Die Lecture-Demonstration steht allen ProjektmitarbeiterInnen und TeilnehmerInnen des Graduate Programme offen. Die Aufführung im DAI ist darüber hinaus auch für die breite Öffentlichkeit gedacht, um das Cluster und seine Arbeit auch nach außen zu repräsentieren. Die Lecture-Demonstration findet in englischer Sprache statt, Dr. Heike Moser steht als Übersetzerin aus dem Malayalam zur Verfügung.  

more info

6.

23th June 2009:

Hege Myrlund Larsen presented on the subject of shifting asymmetries of cultural flows in contemporary Sri Lankan culture “The case of ‘The Ritual’, a play by Center Stage Productions”

Abstract

In post-colonial Sri Lanka, a minority continued to use English as their social language, and to relate to and engage with "Western" culture while the Buddhist/Sinhalese nationalist majority however, was involved in a grand revitalization movement of the Sinhalese language and traditional artistic practices related to Buddhist ritual temple service. "The Ritual" is a hybrid creation that sets out to bridge these two cultural registers. It is the first play in what the director intends to become the "Sinhalinglish" theater tradition - a tradition fusing the acting methods and concept metaphors of the East and West.
Hege Myrlund Larsen is a PhD-Fellow at the University of Bergen, Institute of Social Anthropology.

-> Link
https://kjc-ws2.kjc.uni-heidelberg.de/events/lecture-by-hege-myrlund-larsen-the-case-of-201cthe-ritual201d-a-play-by-center-stage-productions  

more info

7.

July/August 2009:

Common fieldwork of Project B 14 in Sri Lanka

Abstract

From July 22nd until August 7th, in the Sinhalese month of Äsaḷa, the two project leaders Prof. Axel Michaels and Prof. William Sax together with Prof. Christiane Brosius, PhD-candidates Eva Ambos and Silke Bechler, and research follow Dr. Heike Moser (University of Tübingen) visited Kandy, the former capital of the Kandyan Kings in the mountains of central Sri Lanka. Our goal was to observe, document, and analyze the annual “Äsala Perahära,” one of Asia's most famous religious processions and a prominent example of “staging religion.

-> Link 

Common Fieldwork

8.

12th and 13th October 2009:

2-days Workshop with Dr. Hanne de Bruin “Gender and Performance” and film screening

Abstract

Research Project B14 "Religion on Stage" has organised a Workshop on "Gender and Performance" and has thereto invited Hanne de Bruin, the leading expert on gender issues with respect to South Indian female performers. Hanne de Bruin will give an overview of the history of women and performance in a comparative as well as transcultural perspective Europe-India, their representation in the performing arts (vis-a-vis that of men) and the status of women performers.
The workshop will provide a platform to express ideas on women performers both in India and in the West and the ways in which gender is represented and received in selected performance genres.
The focus of the second day will be on the performing arts in India. Central questions will concern the problems of inclusion and exclusion (who perform(ed)? what were/are her motivations and qualifications to be a performer on the stage? reasons (quoted) for exclusion/under representation), professionalism, patronage, recognition (validation of performance genres), competition (commercialization of the performing arts - the Indian performance market), transcultural effects and globalization of the performing arts (the problem of local/locality specific & language specific traditions). The afternoon will be dedicated to contemporary women performers in India. Questions as how “modernity”, and the different expressions it took, has affected the contributions, status and reception of women performers in India will be discussed.
This workshop was open to all members of the Cluster and the Graduate Program. Dr. Heike Moser from Tübingen University, affiliate research scholar to B14 and B2, and Prof. Dr. Heidrun Brückner from Würzburg University participated as „debaters“.Hanne de Bruin is the leading expert on gender issues with respect to South Indian female performers. She has recently started looking at some of the issues in a comparative perspective and taken into consideration recent work on women performers in Europe. It is hoped that new questions will be raised and addressed in the groups of the Cluster stimulated by Dr. de Bruins presentations.

-> Link
https://kjc-ws2.kjc.uni-heidelberg.de/events/workshop-with-dr.-hanne-de-bruin-by-research-project-b14-gender-and-performance  

more info

The project members Eva Ambos, Silke Bechler and Prof. William S. Sax are conducting fieldwork in India/ Sri Lanka at the moment:
Bechler since July 2009 till July 2010, Ambos since July 2009 till March 2010 (second period of fieldwork from the end of June 2010 till the end of December 2010), Sax since July 2009 till April 2010.  

Suche