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New book by Axel Michaels

12. Nov. 2018

Prof. Axel Michaels, founding director of the Centre for Asian and Transcultural Studies and former head of the Department of Classical Indology at the South Asia Institute, recently published the book Kultur und Geschichte Nepals with Kröner Verlag. It addresses Nepalese culture and history out of a holistic perspective and offers an insight into the cultural, social, and political diversity of Nepal.

Currently about 20,000 Germans travel to Nepal per year, with numbers steadily rising; the fascination for the mysterious, colorful country on the roof of the world is undiminished – a fact that is proven with a look at the TV program, where different documentaries compete with each other. Nevertheless, there hasn’t been a book about the history of Nepal on the German market so far.

Kultur und Geschichte Nepals is the first German-language history of Nepal. The volume gives an insight into the development of the cultural, social and political diversity of Nepal and does not tell one, but many stories: the history of the water, of the elephants or the shaman drum, the history of dynasties, traditions, rituals, festivals, and of arts and crafts, which remain largely unchanged until today, because in Nepal, time – and therefore history – sometimes seem to have stood still. Consequently, this book was written for readers who want to overcome superficial considerations and immerse themselves in the colorful diversity of Nepal's past and present.

The book includes chapters on Nepal’s people, ethnicities and regions, its society, statehood, economy, art and culture, the Kathmandu valley and its role in the world. It was published with Kröner Verlag.

Prof. Axel Michaels is the managing director of the Centre for Asian and Transcultural Studies (CATS), and a former director of the Cluster "Asia and Europe." He was also the head of the Department of Classical Indology at the South Asia Institute of Heidelberg University and is a former director of the Nepal Research Centre in Kathmandu.


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